Be Prepared for Winter!

Winter has arrived. Keep the following tips in mind to make sure you and your vehicle are prepared for winter emergencies.

  • Preventive maintenance prior to the winter season is the best way to ensure safe travel. Regularly check fluid levels such as power steering, brake, windshield washer and oil.
  • Make sure the antifreeze is strong enough to prevent freezing of the engine and fresh enough to prevent rust.
  • In cold weather, you may also want to change the windshield washer fluid to one containing an antifreeze agent.

While proper maintenance is key, knowing how to drive in adverse conditions can also keep you safe. The Parent’s Supervised Driving Guide offers the following tips for driving in different weather conditions.

Wet & slippery roads:

  • Turn on the wipers as soon as the windshield becomes wet.
  • Turn on the low-beam headlights; this helps others see you.
  • Drive 5 to 10 mph slower than normal and increase your following distance to 5 or 6 seconds.
  • Be more cautious, and slow down on curves and when approaching intersections.
  • Turn the defroster on to keep windows from fogging over.
  • If you must make adjustments while driving, make sure the road ahead is clear before looking down at the dashboard – and look away for only a second or two.

Snow

  • Make sure your vehicle is clear of snow and ice before driving. Driving can cause snow/ice to slide and block your view, or fly off and strike other vehicles.
  • When starting to drive in snow, keep the wheels straight ahead and accelerate gently to avoid spinning the tires.
  • Decrease your speed to make up for a loss of traction. Accelerate and decelerate gently, and be extra careful when braking.
  • Stopping distances can be 10 times greater in ice and snow. Begin the slowing-down process long before a stop. Brake only when traveling in a straight line.
  • Look ahead for dangerous spots, such as shaded areas and bridge surfaces that may be icy when the rest of the road is clear.

Lastly, check out the Auto Emergency Prepardness Kit Checklist from the Michigan State Police and see what you should have in your vehicle in case you are stranded.

Special thank you to Secretary of State Ruth Johnson for her content.

Halloween Safety Tips

Whether on the job or at home, we should all be mindful of the “little things” that can impact our safety, as well as the safety of those around us. This Halloween, don’t be “tricked” into doing something unsafe. “Treat” yourself and your loved ones by embracing the fun activities surrounding your local Halloween festivities. But, before you do, please take a moment and consider some of these simple safety guidelines:

  • Plan costumes that are bright and reflective. Make sure shoes fit well and costumes are short enough to prevent tripping, entanglement or contact with flames.
  • Consider adding reflective tape or striping to costumes and treat bags.
  • While children can help with the fun of designing a Jack-O-Lantern, leave the carving to adults.
  • Always keep Jack-O-Lanterns and hot electric lamps away from drapes, decorations, flammable materials or areas where children and pets may be standing or walking.
  • Stay in a group, walk slowly and communicate where you are going.
  • Only trick-or-treat in well known neighborhoods and at homes that have a porch light on.
  • Remain on well-lit streets and use the sidewalk when available.
  • If there is no sidewalk, walk at the farthest edge of the roadway facing traffic.
  • Wait until children are home to sort and check treats. Though tampering is rare, an adult
    should closely examine all treats and throw away any spoiled, unwrapped or suspicious items.
  • Because a mask can limit or block eyesight, consider non-toxic and hypoallergenic makeup or
    a decorative hat as a safe alternative.
  • When shopping for costumes, wigs and accessories; purchase only those with a label
    indicating they are flame resistant.
  • Obtain flashlights with fresh batteries for all children and their guardians.
  • Plan ahead to use only battery powered lanterns or chemical light sticks in place of candles in
    decorations and costumes.
  • Take extra effort to eliminate tripping hazards on your porch and walkway. Check around your property for flower pots, low tree limbs, support wires or garden hoses that may prove hazardous to young children rushing from house to house.
  • Consider fire safety when decorating. Do not overload electrical outlets with holiday lighting or special effects, and do not block exit doors.

Our Risk Solutions team encourages you to put these practices into place–doing so helps ensure your safety. Halloween safety is no accident; be safe.