FDA finalizes new requirements for food haulers

The federal government’s Food and Drug Administration released April 5 a Final Rule that sets new sanitation-related standards for food haulers and others in the supply chain, like shippers, who deal in the transportation of food products.

The rule does, however, have a notable exception for small companies: Carriers, shippers and receivers who bring in less than $500,000 in total annual revenue will not have to abide by the rule’s new procedures.

The rule’s key requirements for carriers include: (1) That carriers and drivers ensure their refrigerated trailers are pre-cooled prior to loading food, carriers/drivers provide upon request by shippers and receivers proof they’ve maintained the appropriate temperature for the food they’re hauling and (3) carriers develop and implement procedures that specify their practices for cleaning, sanitizing and inspecting their equipment.

The new rule also requires that shippers inspect carriers’ trailers prior to loading food products and requires any entity subject to its requirements, such as carrier personnel and drivers, to “take appropriation action to ensure that the food is not sold” if they become aware of any indication that a shipment of food was not kept at the proper temperature throughout its shipment.

Shippers will now also be required to give carriers written sanitation requirements for their vehicles and require shippers to keep records showing they’ve done as much.

The FDA says the rule likely won’t change carrier and shipper practices, saying it essentially only codifies already existing best practices for food shipments.

The rule will take effect a year following its April 6, 2016-scheduled publication date in the Federal Register.

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The federal government’s Food and Drug Administration released April 5 a Final Rule that sets new sanitation related standards for food haulers and others in the supply chain, like shippers, who deal in the transportation of food products.

The rule does, however, have a notable exception for small companies: Carriers, shippers and receivers who bring in less than $500,000 in total annual revenue will not have to abide by the rule’s new procedures. Continue reading “FDA finalizes new requirements for food haulers”

FMCSA Removes CSA Data from Public View

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration has announced that, as of Dec. 4, “much of the information previously available on the FMCSA website related to property carrier’s compliance and safety performance will no longer be displayed publicly.”
The agency said the action was taken in light of Congress passing the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act highway bill on Dec. 3. Continue reading “FMCSA Removes CSA Data from Public View”

Congress advances CSA-slathing highway bill to White House

The U.S. Senate passed by an 83-16 vote late Thursday, Dec. 3, the five-year, $305 billion FAST Act surface transportation funding bill, meaning the legislation is only President Obama’s signature shy of being enacted. The bill includes a number of trucking regulatory reforms, and it will, upon enactment, remove carrier rankings in the federal Compliance, Safety, Accountability program from public view.

Continue reading “Congress advances CSA-slathing highway bill to White House”

Trucker medical certification changes begin this month

One part of an FMCSA rule published in April that made changes to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s medical examination regulations will take effect Dec. 22.

Drivers going in for their DOT physicals after Dec. 22, 2015, will notice a new Medical Examination Report Form, which features more questions about medical history. Continue reading “Trucker medical certification changes begin this month”

FMCSA Proposes Changes to CSA

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Monday unveiled proposed changes to its Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA) program, including changing some intervention thresholds to better reflect crash risk.

The agency says its proposed enhancements to the Safety Measurement System (SMS) will improve its ability to prioritize and intervene with motor carriers that pose the greatest safety risk. Continue reading “FMCSA Proposes Changes to CSA”

CVS/pharmacy MinuteClinic practitioners certified to perform DOT exams

CVS/pharmacy, which operates MinuteClinic walk-in medical clinics inside many of its retail operations in 31 states and the District of Columbia, said its practitioners have been certified to perform U.S. DOT examinations for commercial drivers.

A law requiring drivers to see only medical professionals included on the National Registry was implemented in May 2014 to ensure that examinations were performed by certified medical professionals. MinuteClinic nurse practitioners and physician assistants are now included on the National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners, it said.  Continue reading “CVS/pharmacy MinuteClinic practitioners certified to perform DOT exams”

Driver Dilemma: How Important is Pay?

The second half of 2014 brought the largest number of driver pay raise announcements Gordon Klemp has ever seen.

Klemp has been tracking data on driver pay packages since 1995 as the head of the National Transportation Institute. He says a cycle of pay increases began in the second half of last year, with Tennessee-based U.S. Xpress kicking things off with a 13% pay raise. Major truckload carriers such as Heartland Express, Crete Carrier, Barr Nunn and others followed. Some increases were as high as 20%, Klemp says. The highest were for teams that haul time-sensitive long-haul freight. Continue reading “Driver Dilemma: How Important is Pay?”